Friday, 10 February 2017

Preservation or vandalism? Relocating an historic building.

Preservation or vandalism? 
Relocating an historic building


In February 2017 the local press advertised an 1850 sandstone cottage for sale.

The cottage had been disassembled and re-located from its original site to a new locality.

The house had been completely rebuilt in a new locality.

Former Buxton Cottage built in 1850  was re-located to Grasmere in 1973


The house in question was originally built around 1850 and originally called Buxton Cottage.


The cottage was taken apart and re-built in 1973 at Grasmere near Camden on a rural property. It was re-named Wirrinya.

The re-built and re-furbished cottage was offered for sale in a rural-lifestyle estate of Grasmere. The cottage was located on 4.68 acres and offered for sale as a 'traditional sandstone homestead'.

The cottage has Indian influences with a hipped roof-line andverandah all around. It has the simplicity and symmetry of  Georgian influences with a central door and balance by windows.

For those in the Museums and Galleries Sector the views are mixed on whether a historic building should be moved to a new location.

The Department of Environment in the Australian Government states that common arguments for moving historic buildings are:
  • To "save" the building. 
  • To "improve" the museum. 
  • To provide more space for storage or exhibition. 
  • To make the building more accessible and visible. 
  • The building provides a cheap, new space. 
  • A moved building may also exclude a museum from assistance. 
  • Some buildings are designed to be moved.  
Read more here 

Read the report here.